Recent Updates

Martinique

P2280152_1024

a small part of the market in Saint Pierre

We’ve been on Martinique for the past few days. Work had to come first, but over the weekend, we got to explore this beautiful, well cared for island and meet some of its kind, gentle people.

IMG_6605_1024

Schoelcher with Golden Glow anchored off the beach

We checked in at Port au Prince, then continued up the coast looking for somewhere more peaceful than that city of over 2 million. We found it in Schoelcher, where we were were the only boat in the bay, and enjoyed a lovely, simple dinner right on the beach at an untouristy restaurant called Senat on Plage de l’Anse Madame. The next day, we sailed up the coast from Schoelcher to Saint Pierre.

Saint Pierre has a well-stocked grocery store, and with the US Dollar strong and the Euro weak, prices were very good. It also has a renowned Saturday market. There, we found very good produce, spices, homemade vanilla essence, and even fresh fish, and I learned a valuable lesson: always ask the hotness of the peppers!

Previously, in Grenada, Bequia, other English language places, I have been buying small multi-colored peppers that are not hot, but impart delicious flavor. In the other markets, the vendors would say the peppers were “for flavor” rather than being hot peppers.

At the Saint Pierre market, I saw what looked similar to those flavorful peppers. I asked the french-speaking vendor if they were “for flavor,” using the word “goût.” I guess my mediocre french didn’t translate the way I intended.

P3010152_1024

hot, Hot, HOT!!

For dinner tonight, I made a potato dish. I decided to add three red and three green peppers from the ones I bought at the market. I removed the seeds and chopped them with my bare hands and added them to the onions and potatoes. Not too long after that, my nasal passages started to burn, as did my eyes, my hands and my lips. Uh oh…I quickly realized my little peppers were not sweet at all, but hot. As it turned out, they were not just hot, but the hottest of the hot, painfully hot! Rand, who has enormous tolerance for spicy, hot food, said they were good and ate quite a lot, but later his GI system indicated its displeasure. And my hands are still burning now, hours later, even after rinsing them with milk, slathering them with yogurt for good measure, and sticking them in a cooler of ice water.

P2280155_1024

artistic graffiti along the road

IMG_4379_1024

biking is a workout on hilly Martinique

Something else we did here on Saturday was to take our bikes to shore and bike along the coast road and around the north end of the island. Unfortunately, one of our Dahon fold-up bikes had a gear problem and only two of its gears worked, so we stuck to the relatively flat coast road instead of biking up the steep hills and mountains.

Today we climbed Mount Pelee, an active volcano near our anchorage in St. Pierre, Martinique. Mount Pelee is 4,583 high, which offers a lovely cool respite from the temperatures at sea level. We started at the trailhead just above the town of Morne Rouge.  Taxis and buses do not run on Sundays in Saint Pierre, but we were able to hitch a ride from a very nice local lady and returning after our hike, we caught a ride with a nice mother and daughter visiting Martinique from Reims, France.

IMG_4410_1024

sometimes I was ahead of Rand on the path…

…but more often I was behind, catching up

when we were side by side we were happiest

P2280160_1024

View of Mount Pelee from Golden Glow

93168-004-A4B26548

Mount Pelee erupting in 1902

XXXVII

The area’s devastation after the eruption

Pelee slept peacefully today (thankfully), but in 1902, it erupted catastrophically killing 30,000 people in Saint Pierre who had been misled into thinking they would be safe in Saint Pierre if the volcano erupted.

There’s actually a fascinating political backdrop to the volcano story. Politics explain why so few of the city’s residents left, even though the mountain had been sending up many signals that should have told them danger was imminent. Two excellent books on the story have been published:

  • The Day the World Ended by Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan Witts, 1969
  • The Last Days of St. Pierre by Ernest Zebrowski, 2002
IMG_6620_1024

rainbow over present day Saint Pierre

 

 

P3010170_1024

view from Mount Pelee over Saint Pierre and its bay

IMG_4409_1024

view down to ocean

 

P2270161_1024

The end of a wonderful weekend

IMG_6629_1024    P3010166_1024

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*


6 visitors online now
0 guests, 6 bots, 0 members
Max visitors today: 18 at 02:24 am UTC
This month: 22 at 12-16-2017 05:30 pm UTC
This year: 131 at 09-02-2017 04:22 pm UTC
All time: 131 at 09-02-2017 04:22 pm UTC